Posts Tagged ‘YouTube’

A slightly unhinged (get it!) theory about Euron Greyjoy being a disciple of the Church of Starry Wisdom, and serving as the prophesied champion of the Great Other.

This is a video essay about how themes of selfhood and slavery are explored in the fourth season of HBO’s GAME OF THRONES.
It was originally published on Tower of the Hand in 2014.

This is a dramatic reading of Ser Eustace Osgrey’s speech about fighting in the failed rebellion to seat Prince Daemon Blackfyre on the Iron Throne. It is taken from THE SWORN SWORD (the second novella in George R. R. Martin’s DUNK AN EGG series).

This is a brief rebuttal to the R(haegar)+L(yanna)=D(aenerys) theory, popularized by A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE fans, such as Preston Jacobs and SmokeScreen.

This is a dramatic reading of Ramsay Bolton’s letter to Jon Snow, which boasts of King Stannis’ defeat, and threatens to attack the Night’s Watch if his demands are not met. It is taken from Jon Snow’s thirteenth chapter in A DANCE WITH DRAGONS (book 5 of George R. R. Martin’s A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE saga).

This is a dramatic reading of Ser Beric Dondarrion’s speech about the numerous deaths and rebirths he has endured, and the fading memories of his former self. It is taken from Arya Stark’s seventh chapter in A Storm of Swords (book 3 of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire saga).

This is a dramatic reading of Lord Euron Greyjoy’s speech during the Ironborn Kingsmoot, in which he promises to conquer Westeros with dragons, in return for the driftwood crown. It is taken from Aeron’s second chapter in A Feast for Crows (book 4 of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire saga).

This is a dramatic reading of Ser Jorah Mormont’s speech about losing his second wife Lynesse Hightower. It is taken from Daenerys’ first chapter in A Clash of Kings (book 2 of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire saga).

This is a video essay looking at how Kevin Smith’s 1995 comedy Mallrats depicts the American shopping mall as a simulated world. In particular, it draws on Anne Friedberg’s theory of the mall as a distinctly cinematic and performative space.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

In Mallrats (1995), Kevin Smith interprets the American shopping mall as a distinctly cinematic and performative space. Like movies, malls are all about creating a fantasy, a simulacra of the real world, in which the shopper is privileged with the spectarial gaze, and feasts upon the visual and auditory pleasures laid out before them. The character Brodie signifies something of a postmodern (or anti-modern) flâneur, using consumerist and popular culture as way of mediating his place within society. Like the nineteenth-century “city stroller”, Brodie is compelled to capture the “convergence of new urban space[s], technologies and [the] symbolic functions of images and products”. He enjoys simply wandering that space without any particular destination in mind, enthralled by the “pleasures and potentialites of a world removed from the presence, stricture and restraint of tradition” (Clarke 5). The postmodern irony lies, of course, in the fact that the mall is not the cityscape, but a microcosm of the cityscape, complete with all of the consumerist luxuries the modern mind has become accustomed too, but with none of the complexities of life. (more…)

This is a video essay looking at how Francis Ford Coppola’s 1974 thriller The Conversation explores the psychology of sound. In particular: Kaja Silverman’s theory of the “maternal voice”.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

The maternal voice is a fantasy of origins: a representation of an individual’s pre-lingual, pre-cultural form, and their inauguration into subjectivity. Kaja Silverman writes that it is “a moment prior to the creation of the world”, when the infant is wrapped in the “sonourous envelope” of the mother’s voice, and unaware of its own selfhood (72). However, this state of “uterine night” is soon severed once the child becomes aware that it is a separate entity from the mother, thus establishing the subject-and-object (73). This realisation creates in the individual a feeling of incompleteness, and a desire return to the “bath of sound” the mother has nourished them with, which now serves as the “prototype for all subsequent auditory pleasure” (84). The fantasy contrasts the maternal “voice” (which is identified with sound and sense) with the paternal “word” (which is identified with meaning). From a psychoanalytic viewpoint, the subject enters language and symbolic order, but yearns to return to the pre-lingual “wholeness” of the maternal voice (Zizek 47). (more…)